History of Lincoln

  • History of Lincoln School

    Iowa City Public Library: June 1976

    Before Lincoln was built, the children in the area went to Kellogg School, which was built in 1917, or to the University Elementary School, which was closer for many of them.  Kellogg was a two-story match-box style building on a lovely slope, across Newton Road from University Hospitals.  It was purchase by the University and the Veteran’s Administration for $45,000 in 1926.  The grounds were leveled for the Veteran’s Hospital and for Highway Six several years after it was purchased. 

    At the time that Lincoln was built there was one high school and one junior high in Iowa City.  There were seven elementary schools, as follows:

    • Henry Sabin – South of Iowa Avenue., and west of Van Buren
    • Longfellow – East of Van Buren, and southeast of Iowa Ave
    • Horace Mann – North of Iowa Avenue
    • Shimek – North of Brown Street, East of Van Buren
    • Kirkwood – South of the R.R. tracks, east of Gilbert
    • Henry W. Lathrop – West of the Iowa River, north of Iowa Avenue
    • Lincoln – West of the Iowa River, north of Iowa Avenue

    The building of Lincoln School was begun in 1925 and finished in 1926.  Classes began on October 4, 1926.  The president of the school board at that time was S.D. Whiting.  When the site was chose, the president was Dr. Albright who lived on a farm where Lexington and Park Rd. now meet.  Mr. I.A. Opstad, Superintendent of Schools, wanted the school to be built in a more central location on Hutchinson Street.  The property was owned by Mr. James Stronks who later built a home there, and did not wish to sell the property. 

    The Press Citizen stated that, “The selection of this location at the end of Main Street was the occasion of much controversy at the time, but upon completion of the building and examinations for possible landscaping and beautifying of the grounds, the site has been pronounced ideal.”  Mr. J.E. Fogelsand of Des Moines who was in charge of landscaping the capitol grounds and who spent five years in beautifying the Potomac Park at Washington, D.D., became enthused over the possibilities for laying out the Lincoln School grounds.  HE wrote, “It will be necessary to remove several trees in order to afford a clear view from River Street.  Varieties of flowers thrive on these grounds during the summer months, giving beauty and providing a laboratory for botanical study.”

    The front entrance to Lincoln was from River Street.  The main drawback was the approach, which necessitated climbing many steps.  There was no argument about whether or not to build Lincoln.  Its name was chosen by the school board out of respect for one of our great presidents, Abraham Lincoln.  Other names were considered, e.g. West Side.

    The back of the school was on Main Street.  Later the names of the street was changed to Teeters Court to honor Professor and Mayor Teeters.  Presently the back is considered the front of the school. 

    The original building cost $33,761 ($10.00 per square foot).  An article in the Press Citizen indicated that the Lincoln was considered a very modern model school.  The flat roof was designed to hold water which would help cool the building.  The school board however, worried about the roof, which they thought might allow water to leak into the building.  The metal lockers, the improved individual desks, the lighting, and ventilation and the dual purpose gym and stage were all praised. 

    When Lincoln was built it had only two rooms on the present classroom level and a stage which was also used for the kindergarten, and a gymnasium.  The kitchen was present, but was not immediately equipped. 

    Formal dedication of Lincoln took place on October 8, 1926.  The community was invited to an inspection from 4:00 to 6:00, followed by a picnic supper.  The parent-teacher organization furnished coffee and ice cream.  Mr. Thomas Farrell, who helped select the site, presided at a short program.  Mr. O.R. Thomas, the architect, President of the Board, Mr. S.D. Whiting, Dr. George Albright, and I.A. Opstad gave short talks.  Music was furnished by Mrs. A.D. Freund and the Potter trio.  Community singing was led by Professor P.A. Bond, and Mrs. Harold Soesbe, director of the Girl Scouts directed the games.  Directions were given in the Press Citizen for getting to the school. 

    The school opened with about 38 pupils.  First, second, and third grades were in the east classroom, and fourth, fifth, and sixth grades were in the west room.  Miss Nugent taught the upper grades and acted as teacher-principal.  Miss Thura Alderson taught the lower grades.  Since there was no principal until 1947, Mr. Opstad came to Lincoln to administer standard tests, and on occasion, at least, to discipline.

    At the south end of the building was the office. The kindergarten was not used the first semester, as there were not ten prospective students. It was opened with Miss Beufanien as teacher, the second semester.  Mr. Opstad remembers that a heavy curtain kept the children from falling off the stage. The gym was to be used as a community room and the entrance to it was the far north door. The “dungeon,” as the room is now called, was built as a shower-restroom for users of the gym.  Upper grade students also may have used it after gym classes. 

    Class sizes varied, so sometimes there would be too few pupils to hold a class. Parents were the encouraged to send the children to some other school. In the case of the kindergarteners, they were transported by cab. 

    There seems to have been no great differences in discipline and punishment in comparing the practices of fifty years ago and today.  All people interviewed said that teachers at Lincoln did not resort to the dunce stool and cap, but reasoned with the student.  Games played were much like children play now.  The city at the time, however, blocked off streets for coasting in the winter time.  River Street from Woolfe to the river was a great place to slide. 

    The school board later acted at the request of Mr. Opstad and purchased six lots on the north side of Rider Street to add more flat play space to the grounds.  Mr. Opstad also asked that they purchase the property which now belongs to the medical fraternity, but that was considered too much land, and too expensive.  The six lots purchased cost a total of $3600.

    In 1939 there were only 30 students in the school.  It was thought that there would not be a need for a larger school because there was no more room for houses in the Lincoln area.  The mosquitoes were very bad near the river north of Rocky Shore Drive, and before the Coralville Dam was built, the fields there were often flooded.  The population of the Lincoln School area did increase, however, because in 1949 four classrooms were added at a cost of $41,850 and in 1953 four additional classrooms were added at a cost of $54,150.  Remodeling the building was first done in 1973 when the media center was built and the office moved.  In 1974, phase II remodeling of the entire building, as well as the classroom additions, were completed at a cost of $26.00 per square foot.

    Mr. A.D. Hensleigh became principal in 1947.  He was principal at Horace Mann, and added Roosevelt and Lincoln to his duties.  He remained at Lincoln for seven years and was followed by Mr. Murray, Mr. Dick Hovet, who is now principal at Mark Twain, Mr. Jerry Hogarty, who is now at Longfellow.  Lincoln’s current principal is Mrs. Janadene Harvey.

    During the fourteen years Mr. Hovet was at Lincoln he remembers a time when there were five temporary classrooms west and south of the building.  Class sizes were often large with as many as forty children in a classroom.  One year some of Lincoln’s third grade students were bussed to Coralville Central.

    The fears of the first school board were realized in that the roof has leaked through the years.  One morning in 1970 the librarian arrived to find the old wood floors covered with water.  Also, when carpenters cut through the roof in 1973, as they were building the new media center, torrents of water cascaded down on Mr. Hogarty’s desk, papers, and books!

    Children currently in the fifth and sixth grades think the biggest problem Lincoln has faced through the years occurred just three years ago when Lincoln was faced with possible closing.  Parents worked very hard to justify Lincoln’s value as a neighborhood school, as well as to justify the need for remodeling and additional space.  Mrs. Harvey related that the lockers that were considered an innovation in 1926 were removed during the remodeling process in 1974.  There are now 200 students at Lincoln school, 114 of them have been enrolled at Lincoln since Kindergarten.  There are seventeen staff members, however, many of them are assigned only part time at Lincoln. 

    Researched and written by Sharon Krause, Brett Mott, Ann Terry, Rob Rollins, Katherine Beddow, Steve Jennings, sixth grade and Jeff Summerwill, Mona Younoszai, Grant McFarland, fifth grade. 

    Edited by Mrs. Ayres

    1976

     

  • History of Lincoln School

    Iowa City Public Library: June 1976

    Before Lincoln was built, the children in the area went to Kellogg School, which was built in 1917, or to the University Elementary School, which was closer for many of them.  Kellogg was a two-story match-box style building on a lovely slope, across Newton Road from University Hospitals.  It was purchase by the University and the Veteran’s Administration for $45,000 in 1926.  The grounds were leveled for the Veteran’s Hospital and for Highway Six several years after it was purchased. 

    At the time that Lincoln was built there was one high school and one junior high in Iowa City.  There were seven elementary schools, as follows:

    • Henry Sabin – South of Iowa Avenue., and west of Van Buren
    • Longfellow – East of Van Buren, and southeast of Iowa Ave
    • Horace Mann – North of Iowa Avenue
    • Shimek – North of Brown Street, East of Van Buren
    • Kirkwood – South of the R.R. tracks, east of Gilbert
    • Henry W. Lathrop – West of the Iowa River, north of Iowa Avenue
    • Lincoln – West of the Iowa River, north of Iowa Avenue

    The building of Lincoln School was begun in 1925 and finished in 1926.  Classes began on October 4, 1926.  The president of the school board at that time was S.D. Whiting.  When the site was chose, the president was Dr. Albright who lived on a farm where Lexington and Park Rd. now meet.  Mr. I.A. Opstad, Superintendent of Schools, wanted the school to be built in a more central location on Hutchinson Street.  The property was owned by Mr. James Stronks who later built a home there, and did not wish to sell the property. 

    The Press Citizen stated that, “The selection of this location at the end of Main Street was the occasion of much controversy at the time, but upon completion of the building and examinations for possible landscaping and beautifying of the grounds, the site has been pronounced ideal.”  Mr. J.E. Fogelsand of Des Moines who was in charge of landscaping the capitol grounds and who spent five years in beautifying the Potomac Park at Washington, D.D., became enthused over the possibilities for laying out the Lincoln School grounds.  HE wrote, “It will be necessary to remove several trees in order to afford a clear view from River Street.  Varieties of flowers thrive on these grounds during the summer months, giving beauty and providing a laboratory for botanical study.”

    The front entrance to Lincoln was from River Street.  The main drawback was the approach, which necessitated climbing many steps.  There was no argument about whether or not to build Lincoln.  Its name was chosen by the school board out of respect for one of our great presidents, Abraham Lincoln.  Other names were considered, e.g. West Side.

    The back of the school was on Main Street.  Later the names of the street was changed to Teeters Court to honor Professor and Mayor Teeters.  Presently the back is considered the front of the school. 

    The original building cost $33,761 ($10.00 per square foot).  An article in the Press Citizen indicated that the Lincoln was considered a very modern model school.  The flat roof was designed to hold water which would help cool the building.  The school board however, worried about the roof, which they thought might allow water to leak into the building.  The metal lockers, the improved individual desks, the lighting, and ventilation and the dual purpose gym and stage were all praised. 

    When Lincoln was built it had only two rooms on the present classroom level and a stage which was also used for the kindergarten, and a gymnasium.  The kitchen was present, but was not immediately equipped. 

    Formal dedication of Lincoln took place on October 8, 1926.  The community was invited to an inspection from 4:00 to 6:00, followed by a picnic supper.  The parent-teacher organization furnished coffee and ice cream.  Mr. Thomas Farrell, who helped select the site, presided at a short program.  Mr. O.R. Thomas, the architect, President of the Board, Mr. S.D. Whiting, Dr. George Albright, and I.A. Opstad gave short talks.  Music was furnished by Mrs. A.D. Freund and the Potter trio.  Community singing was led by Professor P.A. Bond, and Mrs. Harold Soesbe, director of the Girl Scouts directed the games.  Directions were given in the Press Citizen for getting to the school. 

    The school opened with about 38 pupils.  First, second, and third grades were in the east classroom, and fourth, fifth, and sixth grades were in the west room.  Miss Nugent taught the upper grades and acted as teacher-principal.  Miss Thura Alderson taught the lower grades.  Since there was no principal until 1947, Mr. Opstad came to Lincoln to administer standard tests, and on occasion, at least, to discipline.

    At the south end of the building was the office. The kindergarten was not used the first semester, as there were not ten prospective students. It was opened with Miss Beufanien as teacher, the second semester.  Mr. Opstad remembers that a heavy curtain kept the children from falling off the stage. The gym was to be used as a community room and the entrance to it was the far north door. The “dungeon,” as the room is now called, was built as a shower-restroom for users of the gym.  Upper grade students also may have used it after gym classes. 

    Class sizes varied, so sometimes there would be too few pupils to hold a class. Parents were the encouraged to send the children to some other school. In the case of the kindergarteners, they were transported by cab. 

    There seems to have been no great differences in discipline and punishment in comparing the practices of fifty years ago and today.  All people interviewed said that teachers at Lincoln did not resort to the dunce stool and cap, but reasoned with the student.  Games played were much like children play now.  The city at the time, however, blocked off streets for coasting in the winter time.  River Street from Woolfe to the river was a great place to slide. 

    The school board later acted at the request of Mr. Opstad and purchased six lots on the north side of Rider Street to add more flat play space to the grounds.  Mr. Opstad also asked that they purchase the property which now belongs to the medical fraternity, but that was considered too much land, and too expensive.  The six lots purchased cost a total of $3600.

    In 1939 there were only 30 students in the school.  It was thought that there would not be a need for a larger school because there was no more room for houses in the Lincoln area.  The mosquitoes were very bad near the river north of Rocky Shore Drive, and before the Coralville Dam was built, the fields there were often flooded.  The population of the Lincoln School area did increase, however, because in 1949 four classrooms were added at a cost of $41,850 and in 1953 four additional classrooms were added at a cost of $54,150.  Remodeling the building was first done in 1973 when the media center was built and the office moved.  In 1974, phase II remodeling of the entire building, as well as the classroom additions, were completed at a cost of $26.00 per square foot.

    Mr. A.D. Hensleigh became principal in 1947.  He was principal at Horace Mann, and added Roosevelt and Lincoln to his duties.  He remained at Lincoln for seven years and was followed by Mr. Murray, Mr. Dick Hovet, who is now principal at Mark Twain, Mr. Jerry Hogarty, who is now at Longfellow.  Lincoln’s current principal is Mrs. Janadene Harvey.

    During the fourteen years Mr. Hovet was at Lincoln he remembers a time when there were five temporary classrooms west and south of the building.  Class sizes were often large with as many as forty children in a classroom.  One year some of Lincoln’s third grade students were bussed to Coralville Central.

    The fears of the first school board were realized in that the roof has leaked through the years.  One morning in 1970 the librarian arrived to find the old wood floors covered with water.  Also, when carpenters cut through the roof in 1973, as they were building the new media center, torrents of water cascaded down on Mr. Hogarty’s desk, papers, and books!

    Children currently in the fifth and sixth grades think the biggest problem Lincoln has faced through the years occurred just three years ago when Lincoln was faced with possible closing.  Parents worked very hard to justify Lincoln’s value as a neighborhood school, as well as to justify the need for remodeling and additional space.  Mrs. Harvey related that the lockers that were cosidereed an innovation in 1926 were removed during the remodeling process in 1974.  There are now 200 students at Lincoln school, 114 of them have been enrolled at Lincoln since Kindergarten.  There are seventeen staff members, however, many of them are assigned only part time at Lincoln. 

    Researched and written by Sharon Krause, Brett Mott, Ann Terry, Rob Rollins, Katherine Beddow, Steve Jennings, sixth grade and Jeff Summerwill, Mona Younoszai, Grant McFarland, fifth grade. 

    Edited by Mrs. Ayres

    1976

     

  • History of Lincoln School

    Iowa City Public Library: June 1976

    Before Lincoln was built, the children in the area went to Kellogg School, which was built in 1917, or to the University Elementary School, which was closer for many of them.  Kellogg was a two-story match-box style building on a lovely slope, across Newton Road from University Hospitals.  It was purchase by the University and the Veteran’s Administration for $45,000 in 1926.  The grounds were leveled for the Veteran’s Hospital and for Highway Six several years after it was purchased. 

    At the time that Lincoln was built there was one high school and one junior high in Iowa City.  There were seven elementary schools, as follows:

    • Henry Sabin – South of Iowa Avenue., and west of Van Buren
    • Longfellow – East of Van Buren, and southeast of Iowa Ave
    • Horace Mann – North of Iowa Avenue
    • Shimek – North of Brown Street, East of Van Buren
    • Kirkwood – South of the R.R. tracks, east of Gilbert
    • Henry W. Lathrop – West of the Iowa River, north of Iowa Avenue
    • Lincoln – West of the Iowa River, north of Iowa Avenue

    The building of Lincoln School was begun in 1925 and finished in 1926.  Classes began on October 4, 1926.  The president of the school board at that time was S.D. Whiting.  When the site was chose, the president was Dr. Albright who lived on a farm where Lexington and Park Rd. now meet.  Mr. I.A. Opstad, Superintendent of Schools, wanted the school to be built in a more central location on Hutchinson Street.  The property was owned by Mr. James Stronks who later built a home there, and did not wish to sell the property. 

    The Press Citizen stated that, “The selection of this location at the end of Main Street was the occasion of much controversy at the time, but upon completion of the building and examinations for possible landscaping and beautifying of the grounds, the site has been pronounced ideal.”  Mr. J.E. Fogelsand of Des Moines who was in charge of landscaping the capitol grounds and who spent five years in beautifying the Potomac Park at Washington, D.D., became enthused over the possibilities for laying out the Lincoln School grounds.  HE wrote, “It will be necessary to remove several trees in order to afford a clear view from River Street.  Varieties of flowers thrive on these grounds during the summer months, giving beauty and providing a laboratory for botanical study.”

    The front entrance to Lincoln was from River Street.  The main drawback was the approach, which necessitated climbing many steps.  There was no argument about whether or not to build Lincoln.  Its name was chosen by the school board out of respect for one of our great presidents, Abraham Lincoln.  Other names were considered, e.g. West Side.

    The back of the school was on Main Street.  Later the names of the street was changed to Teeters Court to honor Professor and Mayor Teeters.  Presently the back is considered the front of the school. 

    The original building cost $33,761 ($10.00 per square foot).  An article in the Press Citizen indicated that the Lincoln was considered a very modern model school.  The flat roof was designed to hold water which would help cool the building.  The school board however, worried about the roof, which they thought might allow water to leak into the building.  The metal lockers, the improved individual desks, the lighting, and ventilation and the dual purpose gym and stage were all praised. 

    When Lincoln was built it had only two rooms on the present classroom level and a stage which was also used for the kindergarten, and a gymnasium.  The kitchen was present, but was not immediately equipped. 

    Formal dedication of Lincoln took place on October 8, 1926.  The community was invited to an inspection from 4:00 to 6:00, followed by a picnic supper.  The parent-teacher organization furnished coffee and ice cream.  Mr. Thomas Farrell, who helped select the site, presided at a short program.  Mr. O.R. Thomas, the architect, President of the Board, Mr. S.D. Whiting, Dr. George Albright, and I.A. Opstad gave short talks.  Music was furnished by Mrs. A.D. Freund and the Potter trio.  Community singing was led by Professor P.A. Bond, and Mrs. Harold Soesbe, director of the Girl Scouts directed the games.  Directions were given in the Press Citizen for getting to the school. 

    The school opened with about 38 pupils.  First, second, and third grades were in the east classroom, and fourth, fifth, and sixth grades were in the west room.  Miss Nugent taught the upper grades and acted as teacher-principal.  Miss Thura Alderson taught the lower grades.  Since there was no principal until 1947, Mr. Opstad came to Lincoln to administer standard tests, and on occasion, at least, to discipline.

    At the south end of the building was the office. The kindergarten was not used the first semester, as there were not ten prospective students. It was opened with Miss Beufanien as teacher, the second semester.  Mr. Opstad remembers that a heavy curtain kept the children from falling off the stage. The gym was to be used as a community room and the entrance to it was the far north door. The “dungeon,” as the room is now called, was built as a shower-restroom for users of the gym.  Upper grade students also may have used it after gym classes. 

    Class sizes varied, so sometimes there would be too few pupils to hold a class. Parents were the encouraged to send the children to some other school. In the case of the kindergarteners, they were transported by cab. 

    There seems to have been no great differences in discipline and punishment in comparing the practices of fifty years ago and today.  All people interviewed said that teachers at Lincoln did not resort to the dunce stool and cap, but reasoned with the student.  Games played were much like children play now.  The city at the time, however, blocked off streets for coasting in the winter time.  River Street from Woolfe to the river was a great place to slide. 

    The school board later acted at the request of Mr. Opstad and purchased six lots on the north side of Rider Street to add more flat play space to the grounds.  Mr. Opstad also asked that they purchase the property which now belongs to the medical fraternity, but that was considered too much land, and too expensive.  The six lots purchased cost a total of $3600.

    In 1939 there were only 30 students in the school.  It was thought that there would not be a need for a larger school because there was no more room for houses in the Lincoln area.  The mosquitoes were very bad near the river north of Rocky Shore Drive, and before the Coralville Dam was built, the fields there were often flooded.  The population of the Lincoln School area did increase, however, because in 1949 four classrooms were added at a cost of $41,850 and in 1953 four additional classrooms were added at a cost of $54,150.  Remodeling the building was first done in 1973 when the media center was built and the office moved.  In 1974, phase II remodeling of the entire building, as well as the classroom additions, were completed at a cost of $26.00 per square foot.

    Mr. A.D. Hensleigh became principal in 1947.  He was principal at Horace Mann, and added Roosevelt and Lincoln to his duties.  He remained at Lincoln for seven years and was followed by Mr. Murray, Mr. Dick Hovet, who is now principal at Mark Twain, Mr. Jerry Hogarty, who is now at Longfellow.  Lincoln’s current principal is Mrs. Janadene Harvey.

    During the fourteen years Mr. Hovet was at Lincoln he remembers a time when there were five temporary classrooms west and south of the building.  Class sizes were often large with as many as forty children in a classroom.  One year some of Lincoln’s third grade students were bussed to Coralville Central.

    The fears of the first school board were realized in that the roof has leaked through the years.  One morning in 1970 the librarian arrived to find the old wood floors covered with water.  Also, when carpenters cut through the roof in 1973, as they were building the new media center, torrents of water cascaded down on Mr. Hogarty’s desk, papers, and books!

    Children currently in the fifth and sixth grades think the biggest problem Lincoln has faced through the years occurred just three years ago when Lincoln was faced with possible closing.  Parents worked very hard to justify Lincoln’s value as a neighborhood school, as well as to justify the need for remodeling and additional space.  Mrs. Harvey related that the lockers that were cosidereed an innovation in 1926 were removed during the remodeling process in 1974.  There are now 200 students at Lincoln school, 114 of them have been enrolled at Lincoln since Kindergarten.  There are seventeen staff members, however, many of them are assigned only part time at Lincoln. 

    Researched and written by Sharon Krause, Brett Mott, Ann Terry, Rob Rollins, Katherine Beddow, Steve Jennings, sixth grade and Jeff Summerwill, Mona Younoszai, Grant McFarland, fifth grade. 

    Edited by Mrs. Ayres.

    1976

     

  • History of Lincoln School

    Iowa City Public Library: June 1976

    Before Lincoln was built, the children in the area went to Kellogg School, which was built in 1917, or to the University Elementary School, which was closer for many of them.  Kellogg was a two-story match-box style building on a lovely slope, across Newton Road from University Hospitals.  It was purchase by the University and the Veteran’s Administration for $45,000 in 1926.  The grounds were leveled for the Veteran’s Hospital and for Highway Six several years after it was purchased. 

    At the time that Lincoln was built there was one high school and one junior high in Iowa City.  There were seven elementary schools, as follows:

    • Henry Sabin – South of Iowa Avenue., and west of Van Buren
    • Longfellow – East of Van Buren, and southeast of Iowa Ave
    • Horace Mann – North of Iowa Avenue
    • Shimek – North of Brown Street, East of Van Buren
    • Kirkwood – South of the R.R. tracks, east of Gilbert
    • Henry W. Lathrop – West of the Iowa River, north of Iowa Avenue
    • Lincoln – West of the Iowa River, north of Iowa Avenue

    The building of Lincoln School was begun in 1925 and finished in 1926.  Classes began on October 4, 1926.  The president of the school board at that time was S.D. Whiting.  When the site was chose, the president was Dr. Albright who lived on a farm where Lexington and Park Rd. now meet.  Mr. I.A. Opstad, Superintendent of Schools, wanted the school to be built in a more central location on Hutchinson Street.  The property was owned by Mr. James Stronks who later built a home there, and did not wish to sell the property. 

    The Press Citizen stated that, “The selection of this location at the end of Main Street was the occasion of much controversy at the time, but upon completion of the building and examinations for possible landscaping and beautifying of the grounds, the site has been pronounced ideal.”  Mr. J.E. Fogelsand of Des Moines who was in charge of landscaping the capitol grounds and who spent five years in beautifying the Potomac Park at Washington, D.D., became enthused over the possibilities for laying out the Lincoln School grounds.  HE wrote, “It will be necessary to remove several trees in order to afford a clear view from River Street.  Varieties of flowers thrive on these grounds during the summer months, giving beauty and providing a laboratory for botanical study.”

    The front entrance to Lincoln was from River Street.  The main drawback was the approach, which necessitated climbing many steps.  There was no argument about whether or not to build Lincoln.  Its name was chosen by the school board out of respect for one of our great presidents, Abraham Lincoln.  Other names were considered, e.g. West Side.

    The back of the school was on Main Street.  Later the names of the street was changed to Teeters Court to honor Professor and Mayor Teeters.  Presently the back is considered the front of the school. 

    The original building cost $33,761 ($10.00 per square foot).  An article in the Press Citizen indicated that the Lincoln was considered a very modern model school.  The flat roof was designed to hold water which would help cool the building.  The school board however, worried about the roof, which they thought might allow water to leak into the building.  The metal lockers, the improved individual desks, the lighting, and ventilation and the dual purpose gym and stage were all praised. 

    When Lincoln was built it had only two rooms on the present classroom level and a stage which was also used for the kindergarten, and a gymnasium.  The kitchen was present, but was not immediately equipped. 

    Formal dedication of Lincoln took place on October 8, 1926.  The community was invited to an inspection from 4:00 to 6:00, followed by a picnic supper.  The parent-teacher organization furnished coffee and ice cream.  Mr. Thomas Farrell, who helped select the site, presided at a short program.  Mr. O.R. Thomas, the architect, President of the Board, Mr. S.D. Whiting, Dr. George Albright, and I.A. Opstad gave short talks.  Music was furnished by Mrs. A.D. Freund and the Potter trio.  Community singing was led by Professor P.A. Bond, and Mrs. Harold Soesbe, director of the Girl Scouts directed the games.  Directions were given in the Press Citizen for getting to the school. 

    The school opened with about 38 pupils.  First, second, and third grades were in the east classroom, and fourth, fifth, and sixth grades were in the west room.  Miss Nugent taught the upper grades and acted as teacher-principal.  Miss Thura Alderson taught the lower grades.  Since there was no principal until 1947, Mr. Opstad came to Lincoln to administer standard tests, and on occasion, at least, to discipline.

     At the south end of the building was the office.  The kindergarten was not used the first semester, as there were not ten prospective students.  It was opened with Miss Beufanien as teacher, the second semester.  Mr. Opstad remembers that a heavy curtain kept the children from falling off the stage.  The gym was to be used as a community room and the entrance to it was the far north door.  The “dungeon”, as the room is now called, was built as a shower-restroom for users of the gym.  Upper grade students also may have used it after gym classes. 

    Class sizes varied, so sometimes there would be too few pupils to hold a class.  Parents were the encouraged to send the children to some other school.  In the case of the kindergarteners, they were transported by cab. 

    There seems to have been no great differences in discipline and punishment in comparing the practices of fifty years ago and today.  All people interviewed said that teachers at Lincoln did not resort to the dunce stool and cap, but reasoned with the student.  Games played were much like children play now.  The city at the time, however, blocked off streets for coasting in the winter time.  River Street from Woolfe to the river was a great place to slide. 

    The school board later acted at the request of Mr. Opstad and purchased six lots on the north side of Rider Street to add more flat play space to the grounds.  Mr. Opstad also asked that they purchase the property which now belongs to the medical fraternity, but that was considered too much land, and too expensive.  The six lots purchased cost a total of $3600.

    In 1939 there were only 30 students in the school.  It was thought that there would not be a need for a larger school because there was no more room for houses in the Lincoln area.  The mosquitoes were very bad near the river north of Rocky Shore Drive, and before the Coralville Dam was built, the fields there were often flooded.  The population of the Lincoln School area did increase, however, because in 1949 four classrooms were added at a cost of $41,850 and in 1953 four additional classrooms were added at a cost of $54,150.  Remodeling the building was first done in 1973 when the media center was built and the office moved.  In 1974, phase II remodeling of the entire building, as well as the classroom additions, were completed at a cost of $26.00 per square foot.

    Mr. A.D. Hensleigh became principal in 1947.  He was principal at Horace Mann, and added Roosevelt and Lincoln to his duties.  He remained at Lincoln for seven years and was followed by Mr. Murray, Mr. Dick Hovet, who is now principal at Mark Twain, Mr. Jerry Hogarty, who is now at Longfellow.  Lincoln’s current principal is Mrs. Janadene Harvey.

     During the fourteen years Mr. Hovet was at Lincoln he remembers a time when there were five temporary classrooms west and south of the building.  Class sizes were often large with as many as forty children in a classroom.  One year some of Lincoln’s third grade students were bussed to Coralville Central.

    The fears of the first school board were realized in that the roof has leaked through the years.  One morning in 1970 the librarian arrived to find the old wood floors covered with water.  Also, when carpenters cut through the roof in 1973, as they were building the new media center, torrents of water cascaded down on Mr. Hogarty’s desk, papers, and books!

    Children currently in the fifth and sixth grades think the biggest problem Lincoln has faced through the years occurred just three years ago when Lincoln was faced with possible closing.  Parents worked very hard to justify Lincoln’s value as a neighborhood school, as well as to justify the need for remodeling and additional space.  Mrs. Harvey related that the lockers that were cosidereed an innovation in 1926 were removed during the remodeling process in 1974.  There are now 200 students at Lincoln school, 114 of them have been enrolled at Lincoln since Kindergarten.  There are seventeen staff members, however, many of them are assigned only part time at Lincoln. 

    Researched and written by Sharon Krause, Brett Mott, Ann Terry, Rob Rollins, Katherine Beddow, Steve Jennings, sixth grade and Jeff Summerwill, Mona Younoszai, Grant McFarland, fifth grade. 

    Edited by Mrs. Ayres.

    1976

     

  • History of Lincoln School

    Iowa City Public Library: June 1976

    Before Lincoln was built, the children in the area went to Kellogg School, which was built in 1917, or to the University Elementary School, which was closer for many of them.  Kellogg was a two-story match-box style building on a lovely slope, across Newton Road from University Hospitals.  It was purchase by the University and the Veteran’s Administration for $45,000 in 1926.  The grounds were leveled for the Veteran’s Hospital and for Highway Six several years after it was purchased. 

    At the time that Lincoln was built there was one high school and one junior high in Iowa City.  There were seven elementary schools, as follows:

    • Henry Sabin – South of Iowa Avenue., and west of Van Buren
    • Longfellow – East of Van Buren, and southeast of Iowa Ave
    • Horace Mann – North of Iowa Avenue
    • Shimek – North of Brown Street, East of Van Buren
    • Kirkwood – South of the R.R. tracks, east of Gilbert
    • Henry W. Lathrop – West of the Iowa River, north of Iowa Avenue
    • Lincoln – West of the Iowa River, north of Iowa Avenue

    The building of Lincoln School was begun in 1925 and finished in 1926.  Classes began on October 4, 1926.  The president of the school board at that time was S.D. Whiting.  When the site was chose, the president was Dr. Albright who lived on a farm where Lexington and Park Rd. now meet.  Mr. I.A. Opstad, Superintendent of Schools, wanted the school to be built in a more central location on Hutchinson Street.  The property was owned by Mr. James Stronks who later built a home there, and did not wish to sell the property. 

    The Press Citizen stated that, “The selection of this location at the end of Main Street was the occasion of much controversy at the time, but upon completion of the building and examinations for possible landscaping and beautifying of the grounds, the site has been pronounced ideal.”  Mr. J.E. Fogelsand of Des Moines who was in charge of landscaping the capitol grounds and who spent five years in beautifying the Potomac Park at Washington, D.D., became enthused over the possibilities for laying out the Lincoln School grounds.  HE wrote, “It will be necessary to remove several trees in order to afford a clear view from River Street.  Varieties of flowers thrive on these grounds during the summer months, giving beauty and providing a laboratory for botanical study.”

    The front entrance to Lincoln was from River Street.  The main drawback was the approach, which necessitated climbing many steps.  There was no argument about whether or not to build Lincoln.  Its name was chosen by the school board out of respect for one of our great presidents, Abraham Lincoln.  Other names were considered, e.g. West Side.

    The back of the school was on Main Street.  Later the names of the street was changed to Teeters Court to honor Professor and Mayor Teeters.  Presently the back is considered the front of the school. 

    The original building cost $33,761 ($10.00 per square foot).  An article in the Press Citizen indicated that the Lincoln was considered a very modern model school.  The flat roof was designed to hold water which would help cool the building.  The schoolboard however, worried about the roof, which they thought might allow water to leak into the building.  The metal lockers, the improved individual desks, the lighting, and ventilation and the dual purpose gym and stage were all praised. 

    When Lincoln was built it had only two rooms on the present classroom level and a stage which was also used for the kindergarten, and a gymnasium.  The kitchen was present, but was not immediately equipped. 

    Formal dedication of Lincoln took place on October 8, 1926.  The community was invited to an inspection from 4:00 to 6:00, followed by a picnic supper.  The parent-teacher organization furnished coffee and ice cream.  Mr. Thomas Farrell, who helped select the site, presided at a short program.  Mr. O.R. Thomas, the architect, President of the Board, Mr. S.D. Whiting, Dr. George Albright, and I.A. Opstad gave short talks.  Music was furnished by Mrs. A.D. Freund and the Potter trio.  Community singing was led by Professor P.A. Bond, and Mrs. Harold Soesbe, director of the Girl Scouts directed the games.  Directions were given in the Press Citizen for getting to the school. 

    The school opened with about 38 pupils.  First, second, and third grades were in the east classroom, and fourth, fifth, and sixth grades were in the west room.  Miss Nugent taught the upper grades and acted as teacher-principal.  Miss Thura Alderson taught the lower grades.  Since there was no principal until 1947, Mr. Opstad came to Lincoln to administer standard tests, and on occasion, at least, to discipline.

     At the south end of the building was the office.  The kindergarten was not used the first semester, as there were not ten prospective students.  It was opened with Miss Beufanien as teacher, the second semester.  Mr. Opstad remembers that a heavy curtain kept the children from falling off the stage.  The gym was to be used as a community room and the entrance to it was the far north door.  The “dungeon”, as the room is now called, was built as a shower-restroom for users of the gym.  Upper grade students also may have used it after gym classes. 

    Class sizes varied, so sometimes there would be too few pupils to hold a class.  Parents were the encouraged to send the children to some other school.  In the case of the kindergarteners, they were transported by cab. 

    There seems to have been no great differences in discipline and punishment in comparing the practices of fifty years ago and today.  All people interviewed said that teachers at Lincoln did not resort to the dunce stool and cap, but reasoned with the student.  Games played were much like children play now.  The city at the time, however, blocked off streets for coasting in the winter time.  River Street from Woolfe to the river was a great place to slide. 

    The schoolboard later acted at the request of Mr. Opstad and purchased six lots on the north side of Rider Street to add more flat play space to the grounds.  Mr. Opstad also asked that they purchase the property which now belongs to the medical fraternity, but that was considered too much land, and too expensive.  The six lots purchased cost a total of $3600.

    In 1939 there were only 30 students in the school.  It was thought that there would not be a need for a larger school because there was no more room for houses in the Lincoln area.  The mosquitoes were very bad near the river north of Rocky Shore Drive, and before the Coralville Dam was built, the fields there were often flooded.  The population of the Lincoln School area did increase, however, because in 1949 four classrooms were added at a cost of $41,850 and in 1953 four additional classrooms were added at a cost of $54,150.  Remodeling the building was first done in 1973 when the media center was built and the office moved.  In 1974, phase II remodeling of the entire building, as well as the classroom additions, were completed at a cost of $26.00 per square foot.

    Mr. A.D. Hensleigh became principal in 1947.  He was principal at Horace Mann, and added Roosevelt and Lincoln to his duties.  He remained at Lincoln for seven years and was followed by Mr. Murray, Mr. Dick Hovet, who is now principal at Mark Twain, Mr. Jerry Hogarty, who is now at Longfellow.  Lincoln’s current principal is Mrs. Janadene Harvey.

     During the fourteen years Mr. Hovet was at Lincoln he remembers a time when there were five temporary classrooms west and south of the building.  Class sizes were often large with as many as forty children in a classroom.  One year some of Lincoln’s third grade students were bussed to Coralville Central.

    The fears of the first school board were realized in that the roof has leaked through the years.  One morning in 1970 the librarian arrived to find the old wood floors covered with water.  Also, when carpenters cut through the roof in 1973, as they were building the new media center, torrents of water cascaded down on Mr. Hogarty’s desk, papers, and books!

    Children currently in the fifth and sixth grades think the biggest problem Lincoln has faced through the years occurred just three years ago when Lincoln was faced with possible closing.  Parents worked very hard to justify Lincoln’s value as a neighborhood school, as well as to justify the need for remodeling and additional space.  Mrs. Harvey related that the lockers that were cosidereed an innovation in 1926 were removed during the remodeling process in 1974.  There are now 200 students at Lincoln school, 114 of them have been enrolled at Lincoln since Kindergarten.  There are seventeen staff members, however, many of them are assigned only part time at Lincoln. 

    Researched and written by Sharon Krause, Brett Mott, Ann Terry, Rob Rollins, Katherine Beddow, Steve Jennings, sixth grade and Jeff Summerwill, Mona Younoszai, Grant McFarland, fifth grade. 

    Edited by Mrs. Ayres.

    1976